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Full text of "Wayside Inn front door diaries"

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Danish Educator To Visit 
Cambridge Boy Scout Camp 

Dr. Henrik Madsen, noted Danish 
educator who is lender of a group of 
Scandinavian boys visiting this country 



as guests of American families, is to be 
the guest of Camp Director Hans V. 
Kudlich and his staff this week-end at 
Camp Quinapoxet, the Cambridge Boy 
Scout summer headquarters at West 
Kindge, N. H. 

Dr. Madson will be met at Elmwood 
late this afternoon and brought to Quina- 
poxet in time for supper, after which the 
campers will entertain him with a pro- 
gram designed to illustrate what Ameri- 
can boys do in camp. Dr. Madsen, who 
speaks English fluently, will reciprocate 
by lecturing to the boys on camping cus- 
toms in the Scandinavian countries. 

He will also attend the nightly staff 
conference at which Director Kudlich 
discusses the program for the following 



day. The camp staff, with the exception 
of three members, are all Eagle Scouts. 
Since the centralized camp idea is al- 
most unknown in Denmark, Dr. Madsen 
is making a study of the institution while 
in this country. The boys under his 
leadership have been invited to spend 
some time at Quinapoxet before they 
assemble for return to their homes on 
Aug. 24. 



NO. 78— ARTHUR FIEDLER 

By MASON HAM 



.'erhaps the most uncomfortable so- 
_al experience which an unmusical 
mortal can undergo is attendance at a 
very musical tea. If the hostess and her 
guests incline to modern music it is so 
much the worse. These people have 
their own language, their own manners 
and their own superiority. Their com- 
monest figures of speech are unintelli- 
gible to the outsider. Their very ges- 
tures imply that if you don't know mu- 
sic, you know nothing: you are a lout, 
a boor, a savage; you do not belong 
there. Concurring in this latter 
thought, and longing for the great out- 
doors, you form some opinions of your 
own. 

If such an ordeal has ever been your 
lot. you will be pleased to hear that 
Arthur Fiedler, conductor of the out- 
door concerts on the esplanade and 
part-time conductor of the "Pops" at 
Sj'mphony hall, is one of the easiest men 
in the world to talk to. Even on his 
own subject he is quite understandable. 
He interprets for you, expressing 
thoughts on music in clear, simple and 
non-technical phraseology. If you 
could talk to him long enough, you 
v ould probably learn a great deal. In 
time, we feel sure, quite subtly and 
pleasantly, he would inform you not 
only of the vocabulary, but even of the 
meaning of his art. 

METHOD EDUCATIONAL 

His method in planning the outdoor 
concerts is similar to this. He admits 
that they are educational. He draws 
the crowd with popular selections — old- 
'>me favorites or contemporary musical 
^edy hits; and then, the assemblage 

Ik >red. he treats them with an oc- 
ii lal taste of the finest music ever 
iv en. He hopes that many persons 
-ltually will find the pill even sweet- 
er than thp sugar coating. 

He was born in Boston, of Austrian 
parentage, on Dec. 17, 1894. and is the 
first Bostonian ever to conduct the 
Boston Symphony orchestra. For 15 
years he lived here, attending the local 
schools and learnmg music from his 
parents. In 1910 his lather. Emanuel, 
himself a Symphony player and member 
of the original Kneisel quartet, retired 
to Berlin, chiefly in behalf of the mu- 
sical education of Arthur and his three 
sisters. There the young man attended 
the Royal Academy for tivp 'ears, mar- 
ine his first public appearance as a 



conductor while he was a student 17 
years old. He stayed in Germany at 
the outbreak of the war, remaining 
long after most Americans had fled and 
leaving only in 1915 on the urgent ad- 
vice of Ambassador Gerard. After a 
few weeks in Holland he came to Amer- 
ica and. here in the city of his birth, 
was given a place in the violin section 
of the Symphony by Dr. Karl Muck. 

From this point on his history is en- 
twined with that of the orchestra. He 
has played in it continuously — on the 
violin, his native instrument; the viola, 
the piann, the organ, the celesta and 
even the bass drum. At the age of 20. 
in 1915, he conducted his first Pop 
concert as r.n emergency substitute for 
Agide Jacchia, who had had a sudden 
and emphatic disagreement with the 
management. In 1925 he founded the 
Boston Sinfonietta. comprising 25 of 
the large orchestra's leading players; 
and three years later, with European 
memories in mind, he conceived the 
idea of holding open air concerts on 
the esplanade. 

AURA OF ENTERPRISE 

We are inclined to accept the musi- 
cian as a dreamy, visionary sort of per- 
son, unskilled and inept in the perfor- 
mance of even the simplest business 
transactions. This description does not 
fit Mr. Fiedler. About his person there 
is an aura of enterprise, a hint of sales 
ability. If you know the man, you are 
less astonished that the artist has been 
practical enough to materialize his pet 
idea of good music in the summer out 
of doors. He personally interviewed 
mere than 100 prospective supporters 
of the project. He wrote letters, made 
telephone calls, pursued the musical 
rich until the success of the plan was 
assured. The concerts are his idea, of 
his planning and his execution. 

Until this year he has travelled to 
Europe almost every summer since the 
war. He has visited every European 
country except Russia and has made 
walking trips in diverse sections of the 
continent. He hiked once from Paris 
to Tours. He is fond of horseback rid- 
ing and tennis. He speaks French and 
German fluently and can get along in 
Italian. He is interested in arts other 
than music, specifically poetry, prose 
literature and painting. He has com- 
posed a little but never published. He 
has, however, done a considerable 



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THE OLD POST ROAD 
By Elizabeth Minot 

In the early eightee* hundreds, 

When the quiet streets of Boston 
Knew gigs, and shays,. and waggons, 

And were innocent of din — 
When steam railroads were unheard of, 

And inhabitants of Boston 
Discussed, o'er foaming flagons 

Daily doings at their inn- 
Then the Post Road, broad and winding, 

Stretched between New York and Bos- 
ton, 
Passing "hamlet, lake, and river 

'Neath its shadowy arching trees: 
Cochituate. Quinsigamond, 

Sweet waters, loved in Boston, 
With their sunlit waves a-quiver 

Softly lured the fragrant breeze. 

Tremont Temple marks the starting 

Of the old-time stage of Boston, 
That, rolled through Governor's Alley, 

Forgotten long ago: 
And he who owned the coaches 

That strong horses drew from Boston, 
Free from life's unceasing rally, 

In the Granary lies low. 

Just a touch of the romantic, 

That the annals of old Boston 
Have coupled, for a hundred years, 

With Caleb Easte's name: 
From Gallows Hill in Salem, 

To Bunker Hill near Boston, 
His ancestors, through hope.s and fears, 

Bore Italy's proud fame. 
i 
With snowy queue black-ribbonedj 

M< n's custom in old Boston, 
His dark brown ryes quick flashing, 

He would speed thr> coach away: 
O green, fern-scented woodland. 

How the passengers from Boston 
Longed to seek your streams soft plash- 
ing. 

And o'er Indian trails to stray! 

Here an inn amid the wildwood, 

For the hungry guests from Boston; 
Roast beef, brown, white, and rosy, 

Broiled chicken, game, and cream: 
Then rest on beds of feathers, 

As soft as those of Boston, 
With a rose or sweet herb posy 

To shed fragrance o'er each dream. 

Connecticut — its river. 

Grander than the Charles of Boston, 
With white-rigged boats a-sailing, 

Or fishing here and there: 
Quiet Hartford, elm-tree shaded. 

Kindly friend of old-time Boston, 
With its courtesy unfailing, 

And its fine scholastic air. 

On to the queer Dutch houses, 

So unlike those of old Boston, 
And the strange and quaint upstanding 

Of little old New York: 
'Twas the Old "World they had come to, 

Not so far away from Boston, 
Intense interest demanding 

In its nation-noted talk. 

Now the Post Road still is winding 
Between New York and Boston, 

With autos, busses, cycles, vans, 
And hurry, din and strife: 

But 'mid quiet nooks and waters, 
Loved by travellers from Boston, 

A bridge of longing lightly spans 
I The old and newer life. 




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ROYAL HOBBIES 

Kings and queens, it appears, grow 
satiated at times with inherited gran- 
deur and seek the lesser rarities of the 
market-place like any commoner- Queen 
Mary of England is a familiar figure 
in London antique shops and "galleries. 
Her particular hobby, however, is old 
lace. According to the antiquarian, 
King George finds relaxation in collect- 
ing stamps. His father, King Edward, 



had a fancy for canes, and this collec- 
tion included two of unusual historical 
interest — one fashioned from a pile taken 
from old London Bridge and the other 
made from a bit of the oak tree known 
*o fame as the hiding place of Charles 
II in his flight from Cromwell's forces. 
King Victor Emanuel of Italy is an 
enthusiastic numismatist. Queen Marie 
of Roumania continues to increase the 
valuable collection of perfume bottles 
which was a legacy from her grand- 



mother, the Czarina of Russia. And one 
cannot but wonder if the recent visit 
of the beautiful queen to America re- 
sulted in the addition to this collection 
of some representative of our own his- 
tory stich as a bit of Stiegel glass. 



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COURTHOUSE BOUGHT BY HENRY FORD 




The old postoffice courthouse at Lincoln, 111., the first courthouse in Lo ? an ! 
county, was the scene of the trial of many lawsuits in which Abraham Lincoln I 

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WILL PRESERVE MEMORY OF POET 




Old William Cullen Bryant homestead at Cumminrton; dedicated yesterday. 






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preach at Arlington Street 
tomorrow. 

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Salem Will Begin the 
Tercentenary Series 

Herbert Parker to Be Orator 

at a Union Meeting on 

September 8 

The first official 300th anniversary 
celebration of the Massachusetts Bay 
Tercentenary period in New England 
will be held in the Tabernacle Church 
of Salem on Sunday evening, Sept. 8, 
with Herbert Parker as orator of the 
day. This day is the 300th birthday of 
self-government in New England. 

On this date three hundred years ago, 
the stockholders of the Massachusetts 
Bay Company met in England at the 
house Of the deputy governor of the cor- 
poration and at the solicitation of John 
Winthrop and his associates voted to 
transfer the charter an,1 government of 
the company from England to New Eng- 
land. Up to this time the company had 
been merely an English business enter- 
prise managing a plantation at Salem. 

Some Puritan gentlemen under the 
leadership of John Winthrop had previ- 
ously held a meeting in Cambridge, Eng- 
land, at which they agreed to remove U 
the colony, if the corporation would trans- 
fer the charter and government from 
England to Massachusetts. The vote on 
Sept. 8 was passed in compliance with 
this request and promise. It led to a, 
great emigration of Puritans to the New 
World and as a result a trading com- 
pany became a self-governing body politic 
and. the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
was founded. 

In preparing the plans for this his- 
torical service the Salem tercentenary 
committee had the co-operation of Prot- 
estant churches in Salem, as the plana 
call for a union service. The plans met 
with the approval of the participating 
ministers who selected the Tabernacle 
Church as the most centrally locate. 1 
edifice in the city. Three of the city's 
clergymen were chosen for a committee 
to prepare the program in detail. Thes* 
three are Rev. Thomas H. Billings, Ph.D., 
chairman; Rev. Milo E. Pearson, D.D., 
and Rev. Cornelius P. Trowbridge. 






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The historic house of Nathaniel Haw- 
thorne, known as "Wayside," on Lexing- 
ton Road, Concord, has been opened to 
the public this season. The Concord 
Antiquarian Society is trying to arouse 
public interest in the place, to prevent it 
from being sold for commercial purposes. 

The house was named "Wayside ' by 
Hawthorne, and has an antiquarian as 
well as literary interest as it had its be- 
ginnings in the seventeenth century or 

early in the eighteenth. Possibly it was /To Make "Wayside" Permanent Shrink 
a settler's cabin or a lean-two of four ' 
rooms, to which the other parts were 
built on later. The Alcott family oc- 
cupied the place before the Hawthornes 
settled there and the girls used to play 
"Pilgrim's Progress" up and down the 
stairs. At Wayside, Hawthorne completed 
"Tanglewood Tales" and several other | 
works. 



Allen French, Mrs. Herbert ButtericK 
(Hosmer, Mrs. Woodward Hudson and| 
Chilton Cabot are among the prominent 
Concord people who are endeavoring t<> 
raise sufficient money In order to estab* 
Hsh "Wayside," the old Hawthorne-A!» 
cott house In Concord, as a permanent 
I national literary shrine. 



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Here Settlers Escaped Indians 







Old Indian House, DeerfieJd, Mass. 




lere Savages Heard Sermons 
Indian House Recalling Warfare 



Every week&fiqp during July and 
August, ftfe':':. Christian H'vibxce 
Momtor' pubtftfie's an illitstitited 
historical flcet-th. briefly describing 
places ,(>f -interest to visitors at the, 
M'as&wK-V setts '-r.liay^ Tercentenary, 
celebration in the summer of 1030. 

Deerfleld, Mass., immediately re- 
calls an association of colonists with 
Indians. The Old Indian House there 
which sheltered the early settlers 
ifrom Indian attacks is, therefore, 
especially interesting. 

The original house was built in 
1696 by John Sheldon, ensign. It was 
mortised and tenoned, without a 
single nail in its entire structure, 
and without plaster on its interior. 
The present 5 Indian house, which is 
built in the same manner, is as faith- 
ful a copy as possible of the original. 
Some of its elaborate roon paneling 
was made from material brought 
from the old North Station in Boston. 
.-. In view o.f the exceptionally peace- 
ful aims and origin of Deerfleld, it 
seems odd that all the remnants of 
its important, history should have to 



do with warfare. Here the white- 
haired Eliot prayed and here he 
preached to roving savages. Yet, 
when events stirred the braves to 
hostility, no town suffered more at 
the hands of the Indians than Deer- 
field. 

Visitors to the town will also want 
to see the Frary House and the Me- 
morial Hall. The Frary House was 
built by Samson, son • of John and 
Prudence Frary, before the streets of 
the town were laid out. Samson was 
driven away . during King Philip's 
war, but returned before 1685, it is 
believed, and built this house. 

In 1784 the house was sold, en- 
larged and used as a tavern. In 1890 
Miss C. Alice Baker, sixth in descent 
ffom Samson Frary, bought the house 
and restored it to such a condition 
that today it is one of the most inter- 
esting buildings in the town. 

Over the "bar" in the old "tap 
room," where in 1775 Benedict 
Arnold sealed a bargain for 15,000 of 
beef for the Continental Army, tem- 
perate refreshments are offered now- 
adays. 






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The House in Grand Pre to Be Used as a Museum 







First Church Built There by the Planters 



GAND PRE, Nova Scotia, immor- 
talized by Longfellow in "Evan- 
geline," is becoming a mecca for 
an increasing number of summer 
visitors. A park has been opened in the 
town in which are to be found a replica 
in stone of the old Acadian church, a 
bronze monument of Evangeline and a 
row of willows planted by the pioneers 
from Normandy, and probably it will not 
be iong before a hotel bearing the name 
of Longfellow will be opened in the neigh- 
boring town of Wyolfville, the seat of 
Acadia University. But though most 
Americans are well acquainted with 
Evangeline, comparatively few know any- 
thing of the epoch-making decade previ- 
ous to the expulsion of the Acadians. A 
movement is now on foot to revive the 
history of that stirring period, to make it 
more generally known to New Engend- 
ers, whose forebears figured so promi- 
nently and sacrificially in its annals and 
to honor the memory of Colonel Arthur 
Noble, commander of the Second Massa- 
chusetts Regiment, and one hundred or 
his officers and men, who with him laid 
down their lives in Grand Pre in the 
winter of 1747. 






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COMMODORE PERRY MUSEUM. WAKEFIELD, R. /. 



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FORD REOPENS CHILDHOOD SCHOOL 




The manufacturer became a schoolboy again when he took a seat with children who will receive their primary educa- 
tion m the Old Scotch settlement school where he learned his three Rs. The old school building, which Ford refitted 
and moved to his historical village in Dearborn, Mich., opened its doors again after having been abandoned for many 
years. Mr. Ford (centre) and Earl S. Nelson (right), who will conduct the school, with the children, shortly before school 

started. The children are all from Dearborn. 






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DEVON LOT NO. 352 

Bull, 2 Yrs. Under 3 

$30— $25— $20— $15— $10 
V 

984. Wayside Chief, 9689— Age, 8-26-26; sire, Blue Ribbon, 9431; dam, Primrose; 

Wayside Inn. 

985. Duke of Velvet Roch, 9742— Age, 5-23-27; sire, Diamond Goulden Ridge, 

9579; dam, Duchess 2nd, 16283; John E. Gifford. 

986. Challinger of Hillside, 9703— Age, 9-30-26; sire, Batchelder's Devondale, 

9575; dam, Buttercup 6th, 16634; W. H. Neal & Son. 



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Indian Clambakes 

In the days when the Wampanoag Indians 
claimed this section of the country and later when 
they first sold portions of it to the white men, they 
journeyed each year from their winter quarters on the 
shores of Mount Hope Bay to a place near Westport 
Point called, in recent years, Cape Bial— here to hold 
their annual clambake. 

This trip was made partly by land and partly 
by water. The canoes were launched in Mount Hope 
Bay, paddled as far north as Steep Brook, then were 
carried by the Indians over the land to Norjh Wa- 
tuppa Pond, which in the Indian language means "at 
the place where they draw water". Here the Indians 
again launched their canoes and proceeded southward 
to a place on the east bank of the pond where a land- 
ing was made. From here the canoes were carried a 
distance of several miles along the trail to a point 
about one-eighth of a mile north of the present village 
of Head of Westport, near the old saw and grist mill. 
From this point the Indians paddled down the Noquo- 
choke or Acoaxet River, past the present village of 
Head of Westport, past the present site of Hix"s 
Bridge (where the trail from Acushnet to Seaconnet 
then crossed the river), and on past the present vil- 
lage of Westport Point then called Paquachuck, up 
the West River to a point which in recent years has 
been known as Cape Bial. 

It was on Cape Bial that the Indian braves and 
their chief Massasoit prepared their annual feast — the 
clambake. This occasion was one of the important 
events of the year in the Wampanoag tribe, was long 
anticipated and long remembered by all those who 
participated in it. The heaps of clam shells that today 
can be seen on Cape Bial are said to be the remains 
of the clambakes held years ago by these Wampanoag 
braves. 

It is doubtful if the Wampanoags ever called the 
stream which flows through Westport, "Noquochoke", 
as this word when translated means "the land at the 
fork" and refers to the section of land north of West- 
port Factory near Hixville where the streams divide. 
It is very probable that, instead, the Indians called 
the stream "Acoaxet" — a title found in many old 
deeds and surveys of the town — which means "the 
land on the other side of the little", the river thus 
was given the name of the country through which it 
flowed. 

Ex. from WESTPORT TOWN HISTORY 

by Gladys Gifford Kirby 



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HENRY FORD'S OXEN WINNING PLOUGH RACE 




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Capt. Fred Merritt, an old sea captain, is shown driving the oxen to victory at Southboro fair. 



FORD TEAM WINS 
AT SOUTHBORO 

Wayside Inn Horses and 

Oxen Awarded Prizes 

At Fair 



BOSTON WOMAN 

FLOWER WINNER 



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ISpeelsI rtispnteTn to The Herald] 

SOUTHBORO, Sept. 25— The annual 
fair, cattle and horse show conducted 
this year jointly by the Southboro 
Farmers* Club and the Southboro 
Grange was by far the most successful 
ever held. Attendance exceeded all 
previous records by noon. 

Henry Ford captured four blue rib- 
bons in various events, two being for 
his handsome pair of draft horses from 
Wayside Inn and with prize oxen. Ly- 
man school of Westboro shared first 
honors with Mr. Ford in oxen entries 
exhibition in the town hall. Flowers, 
vegetables, fancy work, canning and 
special exhibit of handicraft produced 
by Lyman school, Westboro, were the 
centre of attraction. 




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The comfortable interior of one of the Universal Aviation 
Corporations tri -motored, twelve-passenger cabin monoplanes 



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Among .several excellent clocks, includ- 
ing a Simon Willard, there is one of 
breath-taking- beauty- It is extremely tall, 
of richly toned mahogany, with a top 
reminiscent of the highboys made by 
Savery, of Philadelphia, with a gorgeous 
carved cresting. Edward Duffield, whose 
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English Home of Puritan Ancestor 
Gives Dawes Freedom of Borough 



SUDBURY, England, Oct. 1 (AP) — 
This quaint old English borough, which 
numbers among its industries the manu- 
facture of cocoanut bifre "welcome" 
mats for the doorsteps of the world, 
had only one big industry today, and 
that was the making of a rousing wel- 
come for Ambassador Charles G. Dawes. 
The ambassador was made an hon- 
orary freeman of the borough, from 
which one of his ancestors, William 
Dawes, set out with the Puritan set- 
tlers of Massachusetts in 1628. 

He was hailed as the personification 

of America's vigorous advocacy of race 

by officials- of the municipality. They 

added that Sudbury looked upon this 

American descendant of a 17th cen- 

| tury Sudbury stone mason as her own 

I contribution to the ranks of the world's 

i statesmen. 

i To make It a suitable welcome, the 
: band in Sudbury market place played 
"Kail, Hail, the Gang's All Here," as 
'the ambassadorial limousine rolled into 
| town from London. Gen. Dawes, replied 
' with his usual picturesqueness to the 
[ warmth of Sudbury's welcome. 



Signing the roster of honorary free- 
men, he told the townspeople he 
thought it would have been impossible 
to pick a better ancestor for an Amer- 
ican family than a Puritan stonemason 
from Sudbury, "a builder, not a de- 
stroyer, a constructor, not a critic. Also 
a man who did not run with the crowd." 

The ambassador lunched with the 
townspeople in the regimental drill hall, 
drank a health with the mayor from a 
huge silver loving cup, spoke fatherly 
advice to the school children and shook 
hands with everybody in the town hall. 
Then he and Mrs. Dawes strolled 
through the town like home folk, chat- 
ting with the friendly people and visit- 
ing some of the historic buildings. 

As he walked along the streets, the 
blue smoke from his well known under- 
slung pipe trailed behind him, to the 
interest of the townsmen. 

Sudbury's welcome included the 
whole Dawes family, and Mrs. Dawes 
was a centre of attention, particularly 
when she drank out of the silver lov- 
ing cup which the ambassador and the 
mayor also used. 



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[Edith Nourse Rogers 

But even widows differ, and we'll have 
to observe Mrs. Rogers apart from Mrs. 
Kahn. Edith Nourse Rogers is thi 
daughter of a cotton mill official; a stu- 
dent at .Mine Julienne's in Paris, which 
did not dilute her bubbling, fervent 
patriotisms and a woman of means, which 
she modestly denies. Moreover, though 
sent to Washington because the la- 
mented John Jacob was the idol of fits 

achusetts district, she is not merely, 
like Mrs. Oldfield, her husband's ghost. 
Most eag< r <>f the gentlewomen, her sti'l 
girlish figure is always fluttering to and 
from the Departments and the White 
House, iarge folders under her arm. Her 
istence, it is said, lands ten men in 
government jobs to a colleague's one. 
Rarely does she take a vacation and then 
it's to fly home to inspect a military 
training camp from the air or to present 
school children with a flag. She admits 

likes the publicity and everj-body 
knows how she loves the flag. Her 
flitting has not drained her 
good nature. She is as merry as Santa 
Clans, and her animated face is always 
crinkling into a smile. Even when she 
violates congressional courtesy by in- 
viting important constituents of other 
Massachusetts members to lunch, they 
■wallow their indignation. Who could oe 
cross with dear, well-meaning Edith? 

First Aid for the Heroes 

Although protesting against her re- 
puted wealth, she is the resource of 
every favor-seeking war hero turned 
down by his own hard-boiled congress- 
man. Returning home after an energetic 
day at the Capitol, she is always certain 
to find two or three, waiting to be taken 
to dinner. A Red Cross nurse during 
the war, she subsequently became the 
mal agent of Presidents Harding and 
Coolidge in work among disabled vet- 
erans, and her interest in them is not 
political. No request they can make is 
too difficult or too absurd for her to 
grant. Once one of them, a Government 
employee, conceived the notion of taking 
his family abroad to see the battlefields. 
To obtain the money he stocked up with 
soap and plied Mrs. Rogers to buy it. 
Not only did she buy a hundred dollars' 
worth; she also besought the rest of her 
delegation to do likewise. 

On the floor, despite her effervescing 
femininity, she conducts herself like a 
man. She doesn't get on her mark, get 
set, and then recite her speech in school- 
girl fashion. Bouncing out of her seat, 
she shoots a question in a high-pitched 
Boston accent and leaps in where ocher 
gentlewomen fear to tread. She guided 
a $15,000,000 bill for the hospitalization 
of veterans, opposed by the committee 
chairman, through the House, and is the 
only woman whose name appears on an 
important piece of legislation. On the 
farm relief bill she bobbed up with a 
plea for cotton. Born next door to a mill 
of which her father was superintendent 
and where she played as a little girl Mrs. 
Rogers understands mill conditions. To 
improve the plight of the workers in 
her district she undertook to sponsor 
cotton along with veterans and quite as 
sincerely. So she wears cotton dresses 
and hose, and urges her male colleagues 
to wear cotton suits. 



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THE LOAN EXHIBITION INCLUDES ANTIQUE TREASURES 

FROM THE HOMES OF 



Mr. and Mrs. Henry Ford, treasures from 

The Wayside Inn 
Mr. C. C. Nash 
Mr. H. V. Long 
Mr. Arthur Wellington 
Mr. A. R. Whittier, Jr. 
Mr. Hollis French, silver 
Mr. Samuel G. King 
Mrs. John H. Harwood 
Mrs. Andrew Washburn 
Mrs. C. F. Weed 
Mrs. Robert Morse 
Mrs. E. L. Clark 
Mr. William H. Mayo, pewter 
Mrs. James J. Storrow 
State Street Trust Co., early Maritime 

models 



General John Stark, 6 pieces from Israel 
Sack 

Mrs. Robert Cushman 

Mrs. John P. Bainbridge, laces 

Mrs. Cyrus Dallin, Indian collection 

Mrs. Percy Woodward, working models 
from famous statues 

Melrose Women's Club 

Lena B. Newton, Mrs. Coolidge's grand- 
mother's desk 

Mrs. George R. Fearing 

Mrs. Ernest Howes 

Mrs. Edwin P. Bliss, Old Staffordshire 

Mrs. Frederick L. Blodgett 

Mrs. May Bliss Dickinson Kimball 

Mrs. Kenneth Lindsay 

South Shore Neighborhood Group 



COMMODORE OLIVER HAZARD PERRY COLLECTION 



Loaned by Mrs. James J. Storrow, whose husband was a direct descendant of this 
naval hero. 

The collection includes: dining table in 2 pieces, drop leaf center; dinner set; silver; 
fire buckets; bedspread; oil portrait, painted by Jane Stuart, the daughter of Gilbert 
Stuart; a silver service, presented by the City of Boston to the hero of Lake Erie, War 
of 1812. 



GENERAL JOHN STARK COLLECTION 

Loaned by Israel Sack. 

The collection includes: Hepplewhite sofa; Martha Washington chair; Tister bed, 
marked Flarriet Stark, known as the Lafayette bed, becavise he slept on it several nights 
on his way to Portland, Maine; Banjo clock (Willard) ; dining table in 4 pieces; 
sideboard. 






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Once Lived in Wayside Inn 

Mrs. Betsy Home Paul Dies in Lexing- 
ton in 97th Year; Was Mother of Mrs. 
Edward R. Lemon 

Mrs. Betsy Home Paul, who died Tues- 
day at Lexington in her ninety-seventh 
year, was the mother of Mrs. Edward R. 
Lemon, who following her husband's 
death continued to operate the Wayside 
Inn, in Sudbury until six years ago when 
she disposed of the property to Henry 
Ford. For twelve years Mrs. Paul lived 
at the Inn with her daughter. 

Mrs. Paul was born in Lebanon, Me., 
and was the daughter of David and Ruth 
(Jones) Keay. She was married about 
1870 to Jeremiah Paul, who was a cutter 
for several of the large Boston tailoring 
houses. He died twelve years ago. For 
,a number of years Mr. and Mrs. Paul 



resided in Medford. For a time Mrs. 
Paul resided in Arlington but early in 
the summer Mrs. Lennon took her 
mother up to Randolph, Vt. to be with 
her and they had reurned only a few 
weeks ago. . 

Besides her daughter, Mrs. Paul is 
survived by a brother, Lorenzo M. Keay, 
eighty years old, living at Lebanon, Me., 
and a grandson, Edward Prescott Lemon 
of Arlington. 






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PAUL — At Lexington. Oct. 15. Betsy Home 
Paul, age 96 years, widow of Jeremiah Paul, 
and late of 34 Bartlett avenue. Arlington. 
Funeral at the A. E. Long Memorial Chapel, 
4 Beech street, corner Massachusetts avenue. 
North Cambridge. Thursday, Oct. 17, at 2.30. 



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LA PAYETTE, by Brand Whitlock; 
D. Appleton & Co. 2 vols. 928 pp. $10. 

Few novelists who have turned to 
biography have been so well equipped 
as Mr. Whitlock for work in their new 
field. There have been many books 
about La Payette, but never before a 
work so comprehensive and Inclusive as 
this one, so well balanced in its French 
and its American sections. In a double 
sense this two-volume biography is an 
outgrowth of the war. When 2,000,000 
Americans went to France to help pay 
the debt owed by this republic to that, 
there followed naturally a far greater 
interest in La Fayette than this gen- 
eration, or those just before it, had 
known.. It was all epitomized in that 
immortal phrase, "Here we are, La 
Payette," attributed to Gen. Pershing 
at the tomb in Picpus cemetery. Mr. 
Whitlock, then minister to Belgium, was 
one of the speakers at La Fayette's 
tomb July 4, 1917, and the implications 
of the occasion so stirred his interest 
that he began the study which results 
in these volumes a dozen years later. 

Mr. Whitlock does" not devote this ex- 
haustive, and probably definitive, biog- 
raphy to any attempt to picture La 
Fayette as a brilliant man in either 
peace or war. It is admitted that he 
was vain, happy when making a show, 
and too vocally virtuous. On account of 
those traits he has doubtless suffered 
unjustly at the hands of many earlier 
historians, except those who have con- 
fined themselves to praising him for 
doing his youthful bit by the side of 
Washington during the revolution. Mr. 
Whitlock recognizes that La Payette 
really belongs more to the history of 
France than to that of our country. He 
was only 20 when he crossed the Atlan- 
tic, fired by a fine fervor. By his ex- 
ample, more than by his military ser- 
vices, he helped America win its inde- 
pendence. Not that those military ser- 
vices are to be minimized, but after all 
they were probably no more than the 
services pf Von Steuben and Kosciuszko 
who came to us from Prussia and from 
Poland. It was when he was back in his 
native land, trying to keep it in a con- 
dition not too far from sanity during its 
own tumultuous years, that La Fayette's 
career moved on to its peak of personal 
and historical importance. He was in 
one revolution or another for more than 
50 vears. 

Writes Mr. Whitlock: "He has his 
American legend, and tie has his French 
legend, but they are quite unlike. He 
has never been the hero to the French 
that he is to Americans; the great ad- 
venture of his youth was the pure flame 
of romance; the devotion to liberty, at 
first instinctive and sentimental, hap- 




visited his old friend, Joseph Bonaparte, 
Napoleon's brother, now in exile, and 
whose kingdom had shrunk to the limits 
of a New Jersey farm. Here in Boston 
he laid the corner-stone to the monu- 
ment on Bunker Hill and heard Daniel 
Webster's celebrated address. And in 
Washington he visited President Adams, 
received a grant of $200,000 from Con- 
gress and saw Jackson inaugurated. 
I A year later, when he set sail from 
Washington on the American frigate 
Brandywine, there was a general holi- 
day in the city, President Adams and 
ihis cabinet were there, and La Fayette 
[said farewell to the land that had im- 
mortalized him. 



From a painting by Victor A. Searles showing the youthful La Fayette leading 
the charge of the American cavalry at the Battle of Monmouth in 1778. 



pened at that initial period of our his- 
tory to coincide with the interest of the 
colonies in revolt. But it was otherwise 
when he got back to France and began 
to apply his generous principles to the 
conditions of an older civilization, and>| 
in the salons of that time, as of this, he 1 
was regarded as a demagogue and a I 
visionary." 

For a. time La Fayette was the idol of : 
the fickle French masses. As a dashing [ 
soldier, as a liberal noble who threw his 1 
heart and sword on the side of the 
popular cause, as the general command- | 
ing the national guard, the mobs ac- | 
claimed him in every square. Bui 
Queen, whom he tried to save, would not j 
be saved by him. He would not join in | 
£he schemes of the knavish and disso- 1 
lute Mirabeau. His simple nature was I 
too honest for that sort of thing. Hence ' 
it was that he had to flee from France 
and while trying to escape to England 
was captured by the Austrians. He 
endured prison horrors and hardships 
for three long years. 

Later, when Bonaparte came to 
power, he was back in Prance, but as an 
impoverished private citizen. Napoleon 
could not win him over. Revolution 
again brought him to a place of power, 
and in 1830 he rode the crest of the 
wave for a brief time. But kings are 
ungrateful, and the Louis whom he 
placed on th<= throne, after tippling off 
Charles X. showed onrj ingratitude for 
his services, He died lonely and little 



honored in 1834, probably counted a 
failure by his contemporaries, but cer- 
tainly a man whose life was eminently 
successful according to the standards 
that history makes enduring. 

Mr. Whitlock fills his pages with the 
great figures of the richly colored his- 
torical eras in which La Fayette lived 
and played his gallant part. In fact 
the life of La Fayette lacks little of be- 
ing the history of his times. Though 
other sections of the book are far more 
important, historically speaking, there 
will be special interest in those that tell 
of La Fayette's visit to America in 1824- 
25. He landed in New York after 
spending Sunday at Staten Island, in 
order net to disturb the Sabbath peace 
of New York. It was nearly a half 
century after his gallant participation 
in the revolution, and every one in the 
new country was determined to show 
to the old marquis gratitude. Vast 
crowds, headed by the "Guards La 
Fayette." awaited him at the Battery, 
and there was a ball that the New York 
Evening Post reticently called "the most 
magnificent fete ever given under cover 
in the world." He began the triumph- 
ant procession that took him through 
every one of the .24 states of the new 
Union. 

At Albany, when the Governor re- 
ceived him at the state House, a stuffed 
eagle was lowered upon his head, bear- 
ing in its beak a crown of laurel and 
immortelles. In Bordentown, N, J„ be 



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Practical Idealists 'Get Together' 




Among Those Greeting Thomas A. Edison (Center) at Dearborn, Mich, at the Celebration of the Fiftieth Anniversary 
of His Invention of the Incandescent Electric Light Were Henry Ford (Left), Who Placed the Automobile Within 
Reach of the Man of Limited Means, and President Hoover, Among Whose Aims Is to Help'ln Eliminating Poverty 
Throughout the World. 



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Dearborn Michigan 

Oct 22nd 1929 i 

Tuesday night 6 O'clock. 



• 



Dear Mr Boyer:- 

Youra at hand this afternoon-thanks very nuch for writing. 
We had a regular down pour all day Monday, but the Old Post Office was 
packed full of people all day. The Dearborn Postmaster had the old Post & 
Office end of the building, and I had the "Drug Store" you would have a 
good laugh at my "Drugs" I took all the different things in a huge lot 
of bottles that were bought fron an old drug store over in Detroit, and 
put all kinds into all old bottles. I had to use some dyed water to fill 
up. I don't think those drugs would make any one feel any better, but they 
might feel different. Anyway every one said the old store looked right as 
to period, and that the arrangement was very good, so that's the main thing. 

I could have bawled wnen I saw it raining Monday-Mr J»rd has worked so hard 
to make this a success-but he was as chearfull as could be, and said he 
"Was glad it did rain-it showed us where we needed to grade the land" 
It was all very wonderfull. I saw Bob last thing last night helping some 
old Gentleman to find a Cab from the Lab front door to the Office building. 
There was not a single car to be seen-all horse drawn cabs, hacks ; stage 
coaches Etc., I had a short ride dn the old Rocket-it goes pretty good now 
but at first the wooden wheels were dry, and it was inclined to jump the track. 

I moved from the Country Club when the crowd gathered, down to the Hotel 
Delraa on West Park Ave No 26. This used to be an apt house but is now 
rufe as a Hotel. I can see right down to the main office from my room window. 
I wanted to come back to Sudbury, but it seams that there are a few things 
they want to have me try and help about. Svry one has been very kind here, 
and I ought to want to stay, but you know how it is-no place like home Etc., 
H ope you will have time to come out here-would like so much to talk over 
things, and also hops I will be comming back before very long. 

I am inclosing some Post cards which may be of interest -we had a lot of 
them at the old post office-no charge for cards or even stamps to mail 
them, and you may beleve they jumped for them. I don't know many went out 
but their must havs been hundreds, 



I go back and forth from the storage shed to "The Village" a good many 
tines a day, and havs the Post Office Drug Store, and 01s Toll House Shoe 
Shop all going good. A Mr Hintz of Detroit who runs a big shoe shop, mads 
two pr of womens slippers in the old shop Monday. 

There is a new building just across the street where they take old time 
Tin Types, and this was of great interest. 

Thank you ever eo much for looking after Mrs T. and so with the hope of 
seeing you before long, and with kindest regards to all, I remain, 

Yours truly, 




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OLD CLINTON INN - PERIOD 1832 - DEARBORN, MICH 



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(Photo by Harris-Ewing) 

Mrs. Edith Nourse Rogers 

The Representative from Massachusetts Recently Made History in the 
House of Representatives When She Opened and Closed a Four-Minute 
Session of the House. Several Women Have Occupied the Chair in the 
Past, But the Lowell Congressman Is the First of Her Sex to Ever For- 
mally Open and Close the Session 



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Radcliffe '28 Girl Engagec 
to a Harvard '25 Graduate 

Announcement has been made by Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles Walter Gerould, of 
Cambridge, of the engagement of their 
daughter, Miss Elizabeth Gerould, to 
Henry Millard Stevens, also of Cam- 
bridge, the youngest son of Mrs. Ralph 
Emerson Stevens of Marlboro and Marble- 
head and the late Dr. Stevens. 

Mr. Stevens was graduated from Har- 
vard with the class of 1925, where he 
was a member of the Pi Eta Club. Miss 
Gerould is a graduate of Radcliffe Col- 
lege, where she was a member of the 
class of 1928. 

In honor of the engagement, a luncheon 
was given on Friday at the Wayside Inn. 
The wedding will take place next year. 






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Naaman* /\« HoUufai-fl Deeded July. 1654. to Swedes by Sachene Peminaeha- Named after Chief Naiman. Oct., 165). Gov. John RUingn built 
naauiaiis-uu-uciawdrc Block-house. 1115ft, Kircd on by Peter Stuyvesant. IB71. Captured by the Indians. 177i>, Captured 

by the British. Iti83. William Penn and Lord Baltimore made this their boundary-line. Beginning 1738, for a century and a quarter occupied by a Robinson family 
very closely connected with important events in American history ; I760,hend of the family, as an officer in Pennsylvania Colonial troops, was killed in battle by the 
Indians; during the Re\nlution his youngest son was wounded three times and had four horses shot from under him; a grandson commanded a vessel in battle of 
Tripoli ; another was officer In charge of the deck on the "President," under Decatur, when that vessel fought an English squadron ; a great grandson, as an officer in 
Civil War. was wounded at both Chance] orsvi Be and Gettysburg. 1777, (Jen. Washington ordered "Light-Horse-Harry" Lee to remove the millstones from the mill; 
one of these stones now forms hearth to ii replace in hall ; l"s. "Light-Horse-Harry" Lee ( npturcd in this house the officers of a British frigate. Before, during and 
after the Revolution Washington was a frequent visitor here; his Secretary of War married here; one of his favorite officers lived here. "Mad Anthony" Wayne was 
a brother-in-law to the owner of the house, and both Washington and Lafayette had many ties to bind them to this home. While resting here, Washington re- 
ceived the news of Howe's landing. Washington planted the original Washington pear-tree here. In tlii>- house were discussed inanv important Revolutionary 
matters by such men as Washington, Lafayette, Wayne, Peters, Morris, Lee and others. 1784 and IS'-M. Lafayette was entertained here. 17*4. Col. Robinson visited 
England, where be «a« rir-t American ottii ,-r to publicly snub Benedict Arnold. This was a famous dficli tig-ground for disputant- frym New York to Washington: 
March 21. 1RH0, a duel between u. S Naval Officer Hunter and Atty. Miller fought here; the latter was killed. President Jackson took action in the case. 1842. 
Gen'J Webb of New York and Hon. Thos. Marshall oi Kentucky fought here. Visitors are always welcomed at Kaamans. 



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John Walker 

[The first matches ignited by 
friction were put on sale in the 
spring of 1827.) 

Eleven years since Waterloo. 

To him who meditates a flame 
A flint and steel are nothing new 

And sullenly he smites the same; 
A picturesque and tedious plan 
Devised by prehistoric man. 

But Mr. Walker, christened John, 
Chymist of Stockton on the Tees; 

Deeply deliberates upon 

Combustibles of sorts and sees 

That they, compounded, may ignite. 

John, as you will perceive, was right. 

"59, High Street," Fortune said. 
And entered just as John had planned 

A match of sulphur overspread 
With antimony sulphide and 

With chlorate of potassium. 

He had dissolved them both in gum. 

Fortune, to John propitious, stopped 

Her rolling stone at 59; 
She nudged his elbow and he dropped 

A match of this unique design, 
Which fell, with Fortune for a guide, 
Before the fire and there it dried. 

Fortune restrained her flying hub 
And, urged by her imperious art, 

John gave the match a casual rub; 
His shoe, I fancy, played a part. 

A fizz, a flame, the wood had caught 

And John had found the thing he 
sought. 

Honour then, with December gas. 

March fire and August cigarette, 
Honour, before the moment pass, 

The match expire and you forget, 
The light that Walker made for you 
Twelve years and less from Waterloo. 

[Punch. 



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1 H. U. Lowlfe&o* . 



ICE MEN MEET IN 
HUB NEXT WEEK 






Convention From Tues- 



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day Until Saturday 



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The annual convention of the National 
Association of Ice Industries will open 
in the Hotel Statler Tuesday morning. 
The convention, "which is being held in 
Boston for the first time, will bring to 
the city ice dealers from all sections 
of the country and will remain In session 
for four days, closing Friday. 

The members will be welcomed by 
the president, M. A. Robins of San 
Francisco, and E. L. Bennett of Somer- 
ville, representing the New England 
Association. The principal speaker on 



the opening day will be F. J. Nichols 
of Dayton, O., who will speak on 
"Marketing and Merchandising." Tues- 
day night, the president of the' national 
association will entertain the directors 
at dinner while the national secretary 
will be host to the various State secre- 
taries. During the business meeting 
Tuesday, the wives of tne members 
will visit the Wayside Inn, where dinner 
will be served, and then go to- Concord 
and Lexington. 

Virgil Jordan, of New York, will speak 
on "Mergers and the Association," at 
the Wednesday session. The entertain- 
ment feature for the day will be a 
boat ride on the S. S. Yarmouth, with 
luncheon served on board, and dancing 
following. 

The most important of the business 
sessions will be on Thursday, when 
outstanding problems of the industry 
will be discussed and officers elected for 
the ensuing year. The annual banquet 
and ball will be held in the evening. 

The closing discussion Friday will be 
devoted to discussion of refrigerators. 
The entire mezzanine floor has been 
taken over for the convention facilities 
and exhibits. 



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SURPRISE FO 
MANY GUESTS AT 
„ WAYSIDE INN 

Announcement Made of 
Marriage That Occur- 
red on July 6 

MISS GERRY BRIDE 
OF C. W. WOOD 



Guests gathered at the Wayside 
Inn, South Sudbury, last night for 

wedding reception, were happily 
r.prised when announcement was 

ade that the bride and bride- 

00m, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wil- 
am Wood, had been married on 
,uly 6 at Salem, N. H. The an- 
nouncement was made by Frank F. 
Gerry of Sudbury, clerk of the 
First District court at Framing- 
ham, father of the bride, who was 
Miss Ruth Gerry of Sudbury. 

Mr. Wood, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
1 Charts Sumner Wood, Packard 
street, Hudson, is designer for the 
Service Rubber Shoe Co. at Rock 
Island, 111. Mrs. Wood, a graduate 
of the Massachusetts Normal Art 
School, Boston, has been fashion 
artist at E. T. Slattery's in Boston 
,and has travelled extensively 
abroad. 



The dinner and reception at the 
Wayside Inn was an elaborate af- 
fair with many relatives and 
friends of the happy couple in at- 
tendance. It is said to have been 
the first wedding banquet and re- 
ception held there since Henry Ford 
became the proprietor of the histor- 
ic hostelry. 

Following the banquet, at which 
the announcement was made of the 
marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Wood, 
i there was an informal reception 
from 9.30 to 10 o'clock and danc- 
ing in the Wayside Inn ballroom 
I from 10 to 12. The music was fur- 
Uiished by a five-piece orchestra, di- 
rected by Fred Stone, famous for 
directing old-time dance music. 
Old fashioned dances were called 
by Harrison E. Brigham of Marl- 
boro. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wood will leave 
soon for Rock Island, 111., where 
they are to make their home. 



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Daniel Webster 

From a Silhouette by W. H. Brown. 1840 



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fty Hij" Excellency 

Frank G. Allen 
Governor 

*A Proclamation 

Massachusetts fondly cherishes those traditional and picturesque customs so 
intimately associated with the early history of our Commonwealth. We are in- 
debted to the pious Pilgrims for having established a day of Thanksgiving — a 
day set apart by them for especially acknowledging for the year's bounty their 
gratitude to the Giver of all good. 

It was at the harvest season in 1611, the year following the landing of the 
Pilgrims, that our forefathers inaugurated the goodly practice of assigning a day 
of thanksgiving. Massachusetts Bay Colony first observed this custom in 1630 
and frequently thereafter until about 1680 when the day became an annual festival! 
in Massachusetts. 

There is no state in the Union where Thanksgiving Day has greater significance 
than in our own Commonwealth. It is uniquely an American institution, originat- 
ing here in our own Plantation of Plymouth and later observed throughout the 
whole American Commonwealth. 

If there is danger to the soul of a Commonwealth or of a Nation in the acquire- 
ment of great prosperity, there is a sure antidote in the cultivation of humility 
and a grateful spirit. We have much for which to be thankful. The year has 
been crowned with plenty. Disaster and war and pestilence have passed us by. 
Educational, scientific, economic and financial opportunities, to an ever-increasing 
extent, have been ours to grasp and utilize. We have been enfolded in peace and 
comfort and manifold blessings have been ours. 

Now, that our citizens may be quickened to a lively and fervent sense of the 
goodness of God in thus prospering all our ways, and in accordance with the custom 
that has prevailed here in the Colony and Commonwealth for over three centuries, 
I, Frank G. Allen, Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, do hereby 
appoint 



Thursday, the Twenty-eighth day of November 
as a day of 

Thanksgiving and Trayer 

In the observance of this day, I request that there be a general display of our 
; lag, the emblem of freedom and opportunity. I plead for the strengthening of 
amily ties, the reunion of scattered kinsmen, and the renewal of friendships. I 
lope that the day may assume all the joyful aspects which we since childhood 
lave grown wont to associate with its celebration. I ask that a deeper compassion 
or those afflicted and less fortunate than ourselves may cleanse our hearts of 
elfishness and greed. I pray that as a people we may turn with thankful hearts 
o God, the Father Almighty, Who ever guides and protects our State and Nation; 
hat we may "enter into His gates with thanksgiving, and into His courts with 
iraise"; that we may "be thankful unto Him and bless His name." 



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"AS ANCIENT IS THIS HOSTELRY 
AS ANY IN THE LAND MAY BE. 
BUTIT IN THE OLD COLONIAL DAY. 
WHEN MEN LIVED IN A GRANDER WAY, 
WITH AMPLER HOSPITALITY—" 

— «3NCPELLOW 



SOUTH SUDBURY, MASS. 



November 
28 th 
1929 



THANKSGIVING DAI 

NEW ENGLAND TURKEY DINNER 



Consomme 



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Roast Stuffed Turkey 
Giblet Gravey 

Mashed Potatoes Buttered Onions 

Baked Squash 

Hot Rolls 

Olives Celery 

Cranberry Sauce 

Hearts of Lettuce Russian Dressing 



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Salted Nuts 
Tea Coffee 



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lints 

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Ford, of Machine-Production Fame, 
Buys Hand-Made Shoes at $6.25 a Pair 

Hcnrv Ford is the ereat machine--fth<» orders had been eivcn bv the Ford 



Henry Ford is the great machine- 
production man of his time, but he 
wears a hand-made shoe. 

Yesterday noon Mr. Ford motored 
over to Wakefield from his Wayside 
Inn at Sudbury and bought himself 
two pairs of black calfskin, hand-turned, 
single-sole, lightweights Oxfords, size 
8 1 -, made to measure over a special 
narrow last. Cost per pair, $6.25. 

The shoes came from the factory of 
L. B. Evans Sons Company, which has 
furnished shoes for Mr Ford for many 
years. But it transpires that although 



♦the orders had been given by the Ford 
Motor Company of Detroit, it was not 
until Mr. Ford's visit yesterday that 
the factory management knew they 
were for the motor magnate himself. 
They were requisitioned through the 
purchasing department, just like steam 
coal or office blotters, and without men- 
tion of the prospective wearer. 

"Mr. Ford wears an extremely light- 
weight shoe," explained Percival B. 
Evans, who with his brother, Arthur 
C. Evans, directs the factory. 

"He buys, accordingly, what is known 



as a hand-turned shoe — a shoe that is 
really inside-out while being made and 
later turned by hand. This necessi- 
tates a very flexible sole and upper, 
and is the method used in making most 
high-grade shoes for women." 

Mr. Ford's visit to the factory yester- 
day was for the purpose of obtaining 
a slightly narrower last than he had 
been wearing. He chatted with the 
foremen and executives, made a brief 
inspection of the plant, and returned 
to Sudbury. He was particularly in- 
terested in the production methods of 
the Evans plant, where a direct an- 
tithesis to his own highly-developed 
machine production practices is to be 
found. 

The Evans factory is one of the^ old- 
est shoe plants in New England, hav- 
ing bsen founded in 1840 by the grand- 
father of the present proprietors, Lucius 
Bolles Evans. Slippers and light-weight 
shoes are the specialty of the firm, and 
almost all of them are hand-turned 
and sewn. About 300 men are em- 
ployed. 



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Official Guide to Exhibits 



of the 



Jfftrat Unafcrn 
Antique lExjwaitum 



Held in the Imperial Ballroom 

of the 

HOTEL STATLER 

Boston, Massachusetts 



December 9th to 13th, 1929 



* 



BOSTON ANTIQUES EXPOSITION 

Executive Offices : 

115 Broadway, New York 



George W. Harper 
Managing Director 




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LIST OF EXHIBITORS 

at the 

Huston Antiqupa iExpasittDtt 

held in the 

IMPERIAL BALLROOM OF THE HOTEL STATLER 
December 9th to 13th, 1929 



'^'SVif 



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CL^^^uD 



NORMAN R. ADAMS, INC. Booths Nos. 43 to 46 inc. 

140 Charles Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

10 Hans Rd., Knightsbridge, London. 

Unity St., Bristol, England. 

Interesting and authentic pieces of 18th century English furniture, together with an unusual 
collection of old china, glass and various smaller articles especially imported with an eye to the 
Christmas trade requirements of the dealers and decorators visiting the Exposition. 

THE ANTIQUARIAN. Booths Nos. 53 and 54. 
420 Lexington Avenue, New York City. 

The magazines and books relating to antiques, rarities and interior decoration. 

JOHN AUSTIN BELDEN. Booth No. 85. 
East Bridgewater, Massachusetts. 

Early American in the rough. 

BESSE'S ANTIQUE SHOP. Booths Nos. 63 and 64. 
Kennebunk, Maine. 

A selected showing of furniture, rugs, glass and Currier and Ives prints. 

BIGELOW KENNARD & CO., INC. Booth No. 51. 
511 Washington Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 
Antique English furniture. Mirrors. English silver. Clocks. Pewter. 

BLANCHARD'S ANTIQUE SHOP. Booth No. 52. 
Center Sandwich, New Hampshire. 
Early American antique furniture, glass, lustre, prints, pottery, pewter, brass, tin, copper, iron, 
silver, hooked rugs and works of art. 

BOSTON ANTIQUE SHOP, INC. Booth No. 15. 
59 Beacon Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

A few unusual pieces of New England furniture and part of its large collection of curios and 
interesting items for domestic and decorative use. Also some interesting ship models and ship pic- 
tures, sea chests and whaling relics. 

BOSTON EVENING TRANSCRIPT. Booth No. 14. 
324 Washington Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 
Featuring the oldest newspaper antiques department in this country. Free copies of the 
Transcript's Exposition section, also facsimiles of the first Transcript July 24, 1830. Matrices and 
forms used for the Exposition section will be on display. 

ARAKEL H. BOZYAN. Booth No. 87. 
Newport, Rhode Island. 

Rare old Persian rugs of the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries. English and American prints. 
Italian 16th century silver Monstrance. Italian 16th century Last Supper (silver). Strings of 
African amber beads of the 12th, 16th and 18th centuries. Autograph collection, etc. 

BY-WAY ANTIQUE SHOP. Booth No. 27. 
Harwichport, Massachusetts. 

Antique hooked rugs. Currier & Ives prints. Staffordshire figures. Old china and glass. Pi«e, 
maple and painted furniture. 



OFFICIAL GUIDE TO EXHIBITS 



CLIFFORD & LAWTON, INC. Booth No. 
373 Fourth Avenue, New York City. 
Publications, magazines and books. 



79. 



COCK O' THE WALK ANTIQUE SHOP. Booth No. 73. 
845 Boylston Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 
Old Masonic Spread. A pine table desk owned and used by father and grandfather of Mrs. 
Calvin Coolidge (historic value). Rare slant-top, bow-front desk (1774). Rare Wedgewood, dolls, 
pitchers, dogs, etc. Portraits: Bradford Children, George Washington and others. 

COFFEE CUP ANTIQUE SHOP. Booth No. 40. 
101 Front Street, Marblehead, Massachusetts. 

Specializing in old lustre. Fine old glass. Furniture and general antiques. 

LAURA S. COPENHAVER. Booths Nos. 81 and 83. 
"Rosemont", Marion, Virginia. 

Historic old coverlets and quilts. Hand hooked rugs. Old four poster beds. Ottomans and 
foot stools. 

COURTRIGHT HOUSE. Booths Nos. 61 and 62. 
9 Charles Street at Beacon, Boston, Massachusetts. 

A French boudoir, which demonstrates a pleasing relation between the old and the new by the 
use of old furniture in a modern setting. 

MARTHA DEAN — SNUG HARBOR ANTIQUE SHOP. Booth No. 75. 
Main Street, New London, Connecticut. 

A group of American antique furniture and interesting small objects combined with examples 
of decorative fabrics and wall-papers, illustrating the dual capacity of this shop which specializes in 
fine American antiques and executes interiors of originality and distinction. 

FLAYDERMAN & KAUFMAN. Booths Nos. 3 and 5. 
68 Charles Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Labelled "Townsend" and "Frothingham" (Early American cabinet makers) fine furniture — 
greatest rarities known. 

GEORGE C. GEBELEIN. Booth No. 28. 
79 Chestnut Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Early silver, American, English and Continental, and Sheffield plate. Old pewter. Antiques in 
metals. 

POLLY GREEN ANTIQUE SHOP. Booth No. 4. 
288A Harvard Street, Brookline, Massachusetts. 
American and foreign antiques. Glass. Mirrors. Rare prints. China. Barrel bureau 1740. 
Bilboa mirror 1750. Overlay glass. 

FLORA HOWARD HAGGARD. Booth No. 12. 
Newtown, Connecticut. 

An early da-bed. Wing chair. Curly maple bureau. Banjo clock signed "A. Willard." Fire- 
place iron, such as toasters, skillets, pots, kettles, etc. Currier & Ives prints. Patch quilts. Lustre 
tea set. Sandwich glass. Lamps. Cup plates. Salts. Bottles. Flasks. Pottery. Early lighting 
utensils. The search for Christmas gifts will be ended for many by a visit to this booth. 

HARLOW & HOWLAND. Booth No. 41. 
20 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Antique furniture. Toile de Jouy. Prints. Maps. Sheffield. Pewter. Books and manuscripts. 

HICKS GALLERY, INC. Booths Nos. 31 and 32. 
16 Fayette Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

English and Colonial antiques. Paintings. Interior decorations. Wall papers. Metal window 
cornices. r 

G. & E. HYAMS, LTD. Booths Nos. 65 to 68 inc. 
The Tudor House, Skegness, Lincolnshire, England. 

a T? ? ld Estonians wi J! b r e show n twelve old Water Colours and engravings of Boston Stump 
and Market Place, also six first editions of P. Thompson's History of Boston. This work is 
becoming very scarce and one would make a very appreciable Christmas gift. Also a very rare and 
historical silver Irish Potato Ring (circ 1745), maker, Robert Skinner, Dublin, very heavily 
embossed and reputed to be one of the finest in existence, together with some very fine Geo. II 
silver from the same family. A collection of seventeen old salt glaze large dishes and plates with 
paintings of old sailing ships. Several very rare marked specimens of Rockingham, Derby, Spode, 



FIRST BOSTON ANTIQUES EXPOSITION 



Worcester tea and dessert services. Sets of Chippendale, Heppelwhite and Sheraton chairs. Book- 
cases in mahogany and walnut, etc. Silver and copper lustre and old Staffordshire dogs, horses 
and groups. 



Finest collection 



SCHUYLER JACKSON. Booth No. 39. 
Jericho, Brownsburg, Pennsylvania. 

Rare and unique Pennsylvania furniture, glass and china in original state, 
of fracture paintings in America. 

MAURICE JEFFERIES. Booth No. 77. 
Skegness, Lincolnshire, England. 
Early English furniture, glass and china. Moulds of Staffordshire pottery, etc. This stand is 
worthy of a visit as it consists of many interesting and educating features. 

JORDAN MARSH COMPANY. Booths Nos. 21 and 22. 
Boston, Massachusetts. 
American antiques of mahogany and maple. 

LOUIS JOSEPH. Booths Nos. 55 to 58 inc. 
14 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

An exceedingly rare and unusual Lowestoft tea service, each piece decorated with ships. Some 
Wedgewood and Waterford glass candelabras. Early English 18th century furniture. Old English 
silver, etc., from the following well known collections: Lord Barnby, Lord Give, Lady Musgrave, 
W. A. Coats, Sir Alfred Jorrell, Lord Lambourne, Ernest Waibell, Sir Philip Waterlow, Lady 
Henry and Sir Edmund Charles Nugent. 

FERDINAND KELLER. Booths Nos. 17 and 18. 
216-224 S. Ninth Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Choice pieces of Early American furniture in pine, maple and mahogany, consisting of high- 
boys, chests of drawers, sideboards, corner cupboards, chairs and secretary. American and English 
silver and Sheffield. Rare china, glass and bric-a-brac. 

KOOPMAN. Booths Nos. 37 and 38. 
73 Chestnut Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

English and Flemish furniture of the 18th century. Fine glass and porcelains. 

LANCASTER ANTIQUE SHOP. Booth No. 82. 
Lancaster, Massachusetts. 

A unique setting for things strictly American. Very early pine, maple and accessories for the 
country home or studio. Pieces that will at once gain your confidence and win your admiration. 
Furniture, glass, china, lamps, pewter, Staffordshire, paperweights, dolls, toys and children's 
furniture. 

LUCIA D. LEFFINGWELL. Booth No. 2. 
Sherwood Studios, 58 W. 57th Street, New York City. 

Handwrought Persian and Turkish antiques, including jewelry, fabrics, embroideries and 
pottery. Copper and brass ewers, bowls, candlesticks, trays, etc. Bronze figurines, Egyptian and 
Babylonian. Iridescent amphorae, terra cotta lamps. Persian prints and miniatures. Small Killim 
rugs. Korans in Arab script. 

ELLIS LEVENSON. Booths Nos. 29 and 30. 
265 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

English and Continental furniture. Tapestries. Paintings. Sporting prints. Brocades and 
objects of art from a collector's collection 

ARTHUR MARTIN. Booth No. 42. 
Box 101, Shelton, Connecticut. 

English mahogany furniture of the Chippendale, Heppelwhite and Sheraton periods. English 
silver, Sheffield plate, pewter and china. 

JOHN M. MITCHELL. Booths Nos. 91 and 92. 
Greenwich, Connecticut. 

A general line of antiques, mostly American. 

GLENN TILLEY MORSE. Booth No. 7. 
West Newbury, Massachusetts. 

Silhouettes from the famous Glenn Tilley Morse Collection of six thousand. The most 
famous silhouettists represented. Silhouettes cut and painted on ivory, porcelain, glass and plaster, 
in black, gold and colors and set in jewels. Edouart's original American Folios. 



OFFICIAL GUIDE TO EXHIBITS 



FLORENCE NESMITH. Booth No. 36. 
78 Chestnut Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 
138 Market Street, Lowell, Massachusetts. 

Foreign antiques. Gifts, decorations, textiles, furniture and small pieces. 

O' CRO' COC HOUSE — LILIAN WILKINSON BOSCHEN. Booth No. 60. 

81 South Street, Freehold, New Jersey. 

Rare collection of Shenandoah pottery, Leeds china, china cup plates, Schimmel toys and 
mechanical banks. 

OLD ENGLISH GALLERIES. Booths No. 47 to 50 inc. 
86-88 Chestnut Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Beautiful examples of furniture and decorations of the Queen Anne and Georgian periods; 
also Georgian silver and Sheffield especially suitable for Christmas gifts. 

THE OLD HOUSE. Booths Nos. 78 and 80. 
682 Main Street, Fitchburg, Massachusetts. 

Choke pieces personally selected this summer in England, France, Italy and odd corners of the 
Continent. American antiques have not been neglected. In this collection are many articles partic- 
ularly suitable for Christmas gifts. 

OLD VILLAGE ANTIQUE SHOP. Booths Nos. 23 and 25. 

75 Chestnut Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

York Village, Maine. 

Antiques and decorations. Fine American and English pieces including importations from the 
British Isles of furniture, china, glass, silver, brass, etc. Several sets of Crown Derby, Dr. Wall 
period Worcester and other choice pieces of the best makers. 

THE OX BOW ANTIQUE SHOP. Booth No. 13. 
88 Charles Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

A general line of New England pine and maple furniture, hooked rugs, china and glass adapted 
for use in the average home. Lamps and shades. 

PIEDMONT HOUSE GALLERIES. Booth No. 86. 
81 Broadway, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Antique furniture and interior decorations. 

P. G. PLATT. Booth No. 84. 
Wallingford, Pennsylvania. 

Large and varied assortment of marked American pewter, together with a background of Phila- 
delphia furniture. 

MISS AMY PLEADWELL. Booth No. 20. 
82 Chestnut Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

French antiques, provincial furniture and textiles. 

THE PRISCILLA SHOP. Booths Nos. 71 and 72. 
Boston Post Road, Weston, Massachusetts. 

American furniture, early and Colonial. Two superlative card tables. Chairs (fine roundabout). 
Chests of drawers. Mirrors. China. Glass. 

QUEEN ANNE STUDIOS. Stage. 
739 Boylston Street, Boston, Massachusetts, 
18th century living room panelled in old painted architectural canvasses. Lady's bedroom in the 
French manner. Early pine dining room. 

I. SACK CABINET HARDWARE COMPANY. Booth No. 16. 
85 Charles Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Antique hardware. 

THE SHOP BEAUTIFUL — G. L. TILDEN. Booth No. 26. 
Northboro, Massachusetts. 

Glass cup plates, salts, paperweights, sandwich lace glass, Early American glass, prints, old 
tin, china, mugs, plates, lusterware, etc. 

THE SHUTTLE-CRAFT COMPANY, INC. Booth No. 9. 
30 Brattle Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

Hand woven rugs, linens, coverlets, pillow tops, etc. In this booth will be a hand-loom in use 
showing how the early Colonial patterns were woven. 



J 



FIRST BOSTON ANTIQUES EXPOSITION 

THE SOCIETY FOR THE PRESERVATION OF NEW ENGLAND ANTIQUITIES. 

Booths Nos. 88 and 90. 
141 Cambridge Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Framed examples of early wall paper and photographs of early New England houses. 

THE SPINNING WHEEL ANTIQUE SHOP — LALLIE LEE KENNEDY. 

Booths Nos. 33 and 34. 
35 Fayette Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Early American, English and French glass, china, mirrors, trays, pewter, copper and other 
interesting oddments. Fine examples of pine, maple and early mahogany furniture, also rare 
Chippendale, Adam, Heppelwhite and Sheraton furniture. 

THE SPINNING WHEEL, INC. Booth No. 24. 
420 Memorial Drive, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

Early American antiques, including a burled walnut Queen Anne highboy with herringbone 
inlay. 

H. STONE'S ANTIQUE SHOP. Booth No. 89. 
303 Cambridge Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 
542 Main Street, Hyannis, Mass. 
Maple and mahogany furniture. Sandwich glass. Hooked rugs. Currier & Ives prints. 

EMMA FENNO STRINGER. Booth No. 1. 
125 Charles Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

American and English antiques. Pine cupboard. Mantel piece. Sets of old tiles. Silver lustre. 
Currier and Ives prints. Ship paintings. Old china and glass. 

THE SUN — NEW YORK. Booth No. 74. 
280 Broadway, New York City. 

Display of the Saturday antique pages of The Sun. Distribution of copies of the first Sun 
(1833). Display showing growth of The Sun. 

AUDREY TALCOTT. Booth No. 10. 
London, England. 

Miscellaneous English antiques. 

THOMAS & DAWSON. Booth No. 76. 
355 Boylston Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Antique furniture and decorative fabrics. 

THOMAS & PIERSON, INC., NEW YORK. Booth No. 6. 
Agents — W. Wingate & Johnston, Ltd., of London, England. 

Packers and shippers of antiques, works of art, household goods, between the United States 
and England, France, Italy and Germany. 

THE TREASURE SHOP. Booths Nos. 69 and 70. 
Hyannis, Cape Cod, Massachusetts. 

English and American furniture and glass. New England hooked rugs. Unusual looking- 
glasses. Early lace glass. Choice chairs, desks and tables. 

WEBSTER PLACE ANTIQUE SHOP — CLYDE C. BROWN. Booth No. 35. 

Franklin, New Hampshire. 
Maple and pine furniture. Queen Anne desk in perfect condition. Very small Martha Wash- 
ington chair in original condition. New England hooked rugs. Glass. Early lighting fixtures. 

THE "WEST WIND". Booth No. 11. 
Dennis, Cape Cod, Massachusetts. 

Early American furniture and household furnishings typical of New England farmhouse, includ- 
ing such English china, glass and metalware as imported and used in early times. 

WICKFORD HILL ANTIQUE SHOP — BENJAMIN A. JACKSON. Booth No. 59. 
141 West Main Street, Wickford, Rhode Island. 

Clocks, furniture, china, glass, miniatures, pewter, silver and ornamental figures. 



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Thanksgiving of the 
Pilgrims for Corn 

Special to the Transcript: 

Washington, Dec. 21 — When the Pil- 
grim Fathers sat down with their Indian 
friends to enjoy the fruits of their first 
year's labor in the New World, at the 
first Thanksgiving feast, corn was the 
piece de resistance. 

We always think about the turkey first, 
in our mental picture of that early feast. 
Our magazine cover artists help to per- 
petuate the tradition, too, by showing 
a Puritan in a steeple hat, stalking a 
proud gobbler with a blunderbuss. Aside 
from the inaccuracy in showing the an- 
cient fowling-piece as a bell-mouthed gun 
of German invention, the picture is all 
fight, for the Pilgrims . nd the other 
Puritan settlers who came after them did 
hunt turkeys in thp woods. But it mis- 
places the emphasis of the story. 

Corn was the chief gift of the Lord for 
which the Pilgrims felt that they must 
return thanks. During that first " ter- 
rible winter, when starvation and dis- 
ease stalked through the little settle- 
ment at Plymouth, it was this new and 
strange Indian grain that kept life in the 
struggling colony. More than once the 
foraging parties in the woods came upon 
Indian caches of corn, and carried them 
home without inquiring too nicely about 
the exact ownership. Theirs was the 
claim of hunger, which is very apt to 
weigh Kfiavlly when title is doubtful. 

In the spring the survivors at Plym- 
outh learned from the Indians how to 
cultivate their grain, dropping a fish or 
two in each hill with the seed, to serve 
as fertilizer. They learned how to make 
hominy and how to grind meal, and to 
adapt this new cereal to their European 
tastes. Prom thjs small beginning, and 
from others like it, in Jamestown and 
the later English colonies, as well as in 
the Spanish and French settlements else- 
where on the continent, the cultivation of 
corn has spread until it is now the chief 
cereal crop of America, and produces 
more wealth in a year than all our gold 
and silver mines do in a decade. It has 
travelled farther than our missionaries 
or our merchants, to China, to Manchu- 
ria, to-"Hungary, to Africa, Australia, to 
the pampas of Argentina, establishing 
American plant colonies all over the 
temperate lands of the world. Here at 
home it has appropriated for its own 
special use the name intended originally 
for all the grains — for "corn" at first in- 
cluded wheat, rye- and all the others 
which we now designate as "small 
grains." Thus has Indian corn con- 
quered our agricultural thinking. 

Nobody knows where corn first came 



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from, nor what its wild ancestor was. 
It is now so highly specialized that it will 
perish if" left to grow wild. And the 
earliest corn we know, small, rather nub- 
biny ears found in Basket-Maker graves 
in the Southwest, is still the product of 
evolution under human guidance, and 
much more like modern corn than it IB 
like any wild plant we know of. It is 
conjectured that corn is the offspring 
of the Mexican wild grass known as 
teosinte, but efforts to repeat the develop- 
ment of teosinte into corn have not yet 
been successful. 

The proper and distinctive name of 
corn, used in England and on the Con- 
tinent, is maize. This name is perpet- 
uated in the botanical name, Zea mals. 
It is probably derived from the name 
found by Columbus in the mouths of the 
Indians of Cuba, "mahiE." 




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PROGRAM 
Master of Ceremonies - Mr. Hatch 
ORCHESTRAL SELECTION 

CAROLS (Everybody sing) 

(a) Come All Ye Faithful 

(b) Joy to the I oriel 

(c) Little Town of Bethlehem 



3. 

4. 
5. 
6, 
7. 

8. 
9. 

10 o 

11. 

12. 

15. 
14. 
15. 
16. 



17. 
18. 



A CHRISTMAS FOLK SONG 

SILENT NIGHT 

A CHRISTMAS CAROL 

HOLY NIGHT 

GIFT OF THE MAGI 

(0. Henry) 
FIRST HON ELL 
GOCu i.^j.Lu iv±_ji 
SLEEP MY JESU 



f'T TT T'l'T'T'' 



George Smith- 
Male Quartette 
Joseoh Ochedov/ski 
Chorus 
Arthur Logue 

Junior Trade School Chor\ 
John Lindberg 

Mr . Boyer 

t T Tin - ' r< ■ vm ,' 

I'.IJ-UJX l-U-U' Xii 

Redstone School Children 
Trade School Chorus 
Charles Nebber 
Double Quartette 
Geor : n ;e Johnson 



HARK THE HERALD ANGELS SING 
THE SHEPHERD WHO STAYED 
COME TO MY HEART LORD JESUS 
WINTER . • 

CAROLS (Once more - everyone) 

(a) It Came Uoon the Midnight Clear 
■(b) While Shepherds Patched . 

(c) Silent- Night 
THE NIGHT BEFORE CHRISTMAS , Mr. Varrichione 

ORCHESTRAL SELECTIONS^ ^ 



COLiE ALL YE FAITHFUL 

come, all ye faithful, .joyful and 

triumphant j 
come ye, come ye to Bethlehem 3 
Come and behold Him, born bhe King of 
come, let us adore Kim, ^ngelsi 
come, let us adore Him, 
cone, let us adore Him, 
Christ the Lord. 

Yea, Lord, we greet Thee .,< born this 

happy morning . 
J ecus, to Thee be glory giv'n, 
Voi'd of uhe Father, now in flesh 

appe "■.ring 
■ come, let us adore Him, 
come, let us adore Him, 
cone, let us "lore Him, 
Christ the Lord. 

JOI TO THE i.OPLD 

Joy to the i;orldl the Lord is. cone; 

Let earth receive her King, 

Let ev'ry heart prepare Him room, 

And Heav'n and nature sing, 

And heav'n and nature sing, 

And heav'n, and Heav'n and nature sing. 

He rules the world with truth and grace 

and makes the nations prove 

The glories of His righteousness, 

i'aid wonders of His love, 

And wonders of His love,- 

and wonders, wonders of His Dove. 

LITTLE TOPN OF BETHL2HEE 

little town of Bethlehem I 

Ho'u still i;e see thee lie, 

/bove thy deep end dreamless sleep 

The silent stars go by; 

Yet in thy dark streets shinet'h 

The everlasting Light; 

The hopes and fears of all the years 

/re me" 1- - in thee tonight. 

holy Child of Bethlehem'. 

Descend to us, we pray; 

Cast out our sin, and enter in, 

Be born in us today. 

l.e hear bhe Christmas angels, 

The great glad tidings tell]; 

come to us, -.bide with us, 

Our Lord Emmanuel 1 



IT Chili, UTOH THE (uIDNlGHI CHEAP 

It came upon the midnight clear, 

That glorious song of old, 

From angels bonding ne ; r the earth. 

To touch their h res of gold; 

! 'Pe"ce on the earth, good-will to men 



Inl-i nl 



1 rrracious Kin: 



iron no" v'n 

The world in solemn stillness lay 

To hear the an. gels sing. 

For loi the days are h st'ning on, 

By prophets seen of old, 

■ hen with the ever circling years, 

Shall come the time- foretold. 

lien the new heav'n "and earth shall own 

The Prince of Perce their King, 

And the whole world" send back the song 

hhich now the angels sing-.. 

Y.HILL! SKEFE-llDS i.AaCILh) THEIR FLOCKS 

hhile shepherds watch' d their flocks by 
,11 seated on the ground, night. 
The angel of the Lord came down, 
ind glory shone "round. 

: Fe.\r not, i: said he, for nighty are. d 
Had seised their troubled mir.dj 
''CI d tidings of great joy I brin;: 
To you ■" nd all mankind . 

:! To you, in David's town, this day 
lv. born of David's line, 
The Saviour, who is Christ the Lord, 
and this shall be the sign. 

"The Heav'nly Babe you there shall find 
To human "view display'd, 
All meanly wrapt in sw thing bands, 
'ad in a manger laid." 

siLEWI lMluiij. 

Silent night I Holy night 1 

All is calm, all is .bright, 

hound yon virgin mother ~nu Child! 

holy Infant, so tender and mild, 

Sleep in heavenly peace, 

S leop ii i he r.ven Ij pe "ce. 

Silent right! holy night! 
Sen of Cod, love Is pure light 
Radirnt beams from Thy holy face, 
Pith the dawn of redeeming grace, 
Jesus, Lena, ~..t Thy birth, 
Jesus, Lore'., <t Thy birth. 



"CHRISILiLS, more than any other in our 
civilization j is the festival oT joyc 
And music, nore than any >ther art 
which that civilization has created, 

is the purest of joy's expressions." 



( • 



< x 



4 



THE WORCESTER ROADS ' 

Any one who has motored over the Boston 
Post Road to Worcester on a Sunday or holi- 
day will find it difficult, at least on first 
thought, to sympathize with citizens of North- 
boro, Marlboro, Sudbury and other communities 
along the route who look with displeasure on 
the state's plan to rebuild the Worcester turn- 
pike through Framingham, thus creating an- 
other direct highway. The present road, much 
as it has been reconstructed near Henry Ford's 
Wayside Inn and at other points, is inadequate 
for the heavy traffic between the two largest 
cities in Massachusetts. Any attempt to delay 
the rebuilding of the turnpike, which is several 
miles shorter than the present route, is likely 
to appear a selfish gesture to inconvenience 
motorists throughout the state. 

It is good to hear, therefore, that Marlboro 
and its neighbors do not oppose the new route 
but merely wish the Post Road improved be- 
fore work on the other begins. If these im- 
provements are not too extensive and do not 
materially delay the Wellesley-Framingham- 
Shrewsbury project, no one can seriously object. 
Citizens of the Post Road towns have large 
investments in garages, hotels, and wayside 
stands, and It would be unfair to them if that 
road were neglected. But there Is business 
enough for two good highways between Boston 
and Worcester and the better and' wider the 
roads, the more motorists will be inclined to 
Use them. Marlboro may fear the Framing- 
ham route now, but we doubt whether it will 
find its fears justified five years from now. 



Jpftrr^J*% 2m, i^xA 





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SOUTH SUDBURY, MASS. 

Wednesday, 1929 

CHRISTMAS DINNER 



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